Sponsored Blog Post Rates

Are You Being Conned? Fair Sponsored Blog Post Rates and Best Practice Guidelines

Looking for sponsored blog post rates? Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying blogging is going to make you rich. Most likely it won’t. But money is useful and maybe, like many other bloggers, you dream of making money from your blog one day.

In my experience blogging is largely a labour of love, especially in niches like travel, a topic I started blogging about three years ago and still cover devotedly. You can check out my travel blog if you wish, but if you’re not familiar with Get In the Hot Spot I started it almost three years ago and have been selling advertising for about a year.

My main focus here on Successful Blogging is not usually blog monetization but to help other small business owners or writers use blogging to sell more of their services or products.

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Blogging is brilliant for that – it’s helped me get a lot of well paid freelance writing work, including some sweet travel writing gigs, and it’s also helped me find more clients for my web and blog design business. Well, I didn’t find them, they found me through my blogs.

Normally I avoid writing about making money from blog advertising because it’s not relevant to writers and small business owners. But there are more and more blog writers here on Successful Blogging who are hoping to make an income directly from their blog.

Some of my blog design clients, Successful Blogging in 12 Simple Steps readers and people I’ve worked with through private consultations are now being approached for advertising and don’t know how much to charge for sponsored blog posts.

Plus I keep hearing stories about how much (or little) bloggers charge for sponsored blog posts and seeing recommendations about how  much to charge for sponsored blog posts which think are way to low. I can’t stand the thought of small business owners and bloggers being badly paid for valuable access to their readers so it’s time for me to weigh in.

What is a Sponsored Blog Post?

A sponsored blog post is a blog post which you are paid publish on your blog. It may be written by you or by the advertisers.

In accordance with FTC regulations you should always mention that it’s a sponsored blog post, usually at the end of the post with a byline such as:

“This blog post was sponsored by (Name Brand Here).”

Even if you are not legally bound to disclose that you’ve been paid to publish a post you should.

Trust and authenticity are important and your readers will soon become disillusioned and jaded if you mislead them, whether intentionally or accidentally.

Sponsored Blog Post Rate Recommendations

I’ve seen several rate charts for sponsored blog posts. I think they’re way too low and cause bloggers to undersell themselves which is why I want to set a new standard here.

Some like this rate calculation are based on complicated algorithms where you add you number of monthly page views to your number of Twitter followers, divide it by your Google Page Rank and so on.

Even that site admits the algorithm doesn’t work because you should get paid more, not less, the higher your Google Page Rank is.

What Blog Advertising Agencies Charge for Sponsored Blog Posts

Based on the above algorithm I should charge about $55 per sponsored blog post on Get In the Hot Spot. Sadly it would hardly be worth my time dealing with an advertiser, writing a post, publishing and promoting it for that low rate.

I wouldn’t recommend that bloggers sell sponsored blog posts for such a low figure unless they don’t have a loyal and returning readership and don’t care about losing the readers they do have.

In fact I charge (and get paid) about 14 times that rate.

I didn’t pick my rate at random either.

I based my current sponsored blog post rate on what a big blog advertising agency charges brands for sponsored blog posts on blogs with similar traffic to mine. I can’t reveal my sources but I got this information from a leading blogger who uses a major blog advertising agency.

The brands actually pay the blog advertising agency twice as much as that but the agency keeps 50% and gives the blogger around 50%.

Since I know some brand pay $1,500 through a blog advertising agency for a sponsored blog post on a blog with similar traffic to mine and I charge half the price I believe my rate offers excellent value.

Of course some companies and brands won’t pay a high rate but that’s fine, I want to attract quality advertisers who value my blog and readers by offering a quality publication. I run my web design business on the same principle. Charging more and delivering better quality and results works out best for both parties bloggers and advertisers.

There’s a rate card for sponsored blog posts here which undercharges by up to $350 per post according to my rates, or by up to $1,050 according to what an advertising agency might charge. That’s a huge difference and a lot of money being lost. Or a lot of bloggers being ripped off because they don’t know what to charge.

Here are my suggestions on what bloggers should charge for sponsored blog posts.

I’m using two metrics here, unique visitors per month and Google PageRank, as a means of establishing a blog’s traffic, age and authority.

sponsored blog post rates

A guideline for sponsored blog post rates – you decide what value you offer advertisers

 

How to Decide What to Charge for Sponsored Blog Posts

You can see there’s a lot of lee way in my rate suggestions. It’s up to you to decide what to charge but when setting your rate you should consider:

  • How many sponsored blog posts you’ll write each month. For example, you could promise only two sponsored blog posts a month and charge more for that exclusivity.
  • Would you prefer to offer more sponsored blog posts at a lower rate or less at a higher rate? I’d prefer to work with few clients and charge more.
  • What else you can offer your advertisers in terms of exposure on your other social media outposts such as Twitter or Facebook.
  • If running a sponsored blog post by a certain brand will provide value to your readers and add to your blogging credibility or could undermine it.
  • If the brand has the same values as your blogging brand.
  • If the brand or product is something that would naturally interest your readers and fit with what you normally cover on your blog.
  • How  much time you’ll spend researching, writing and finding images for the sponsored blog post.
  • If you’ll write the post yourself or just edit and format a post the advertiser has written.
  • How much influence you have online and if that will be eroded if you work with certain brands or promote too many different brands too often.
  • If the post needs to be an advertorial about the product or if you can just write your normal blog post or a post on a related topic without pushing a brand or product.
  • How engaged your blog readers are. I believe engagement is more important than the number of readers a blog has.

Best Practice Tips for Sponsored Blog Posts

1. Start small

If you haven’t sold any sponsored blog posts yet start by charging less until you can build up a portfolio to show other advertisers and get testimonials.

Remember, these will be your first paid advertisements and sponsored blog posts which you can show other clients so you want to make sure they look good and get comments.

2. Set a rate according to your experience, reputation and influence

I’m qualified and have 17 years experience writing copy for the web. I charge $125-$250 per hour for web copywriting and my rates for sponsored blog posts reflect that.

3. Take payment in advance.

I won’t start writing a post until I’ve been paid.

4. Be professional

Establish a clear process for accepting and publishing sponsored blog posts such as:

  • payment taken;
  • headline approved;
  • blog post written;
  • changes made if requested by client;
  • final copy approved;
  • blog post scheduled;
  • blog post published.

You can do this in your media kit by explaining what you offer and for what price. In my media kit I say all sponsored blog posts are written by me. That also accounts for the high rate as it pays for my time.

I rarely take posts where the advertiser writes it but when I have I suggest the headline, have final say and edit their copy. I charged less as I didn’t have to write it but editing, formatting, promoting still takes time.

5. Compete on quality not price

Generally I will only accept a sponsored post if I write it myself because I don’t want to run the risk of having boring content on my blog and losing readers in exchange for money.

So I need to be paid for writing time, for building a conversation around a brand and for making them look cool.

Many companies that approach you aren’t interested in that anyway and look as sponsored blog posts as a way to build incoming links and improve their search engine optimisation.

I’m not selling an incoming link on set key phrases though, I’m selling access to an engaged readership, exclusivity (because I limit the number of blog posts) and the chance to be featured on an established and high quality blog.

6. Prime your readers

When you start writing sponsored blog posts let your readers know why you’re doing that and how it will benefit the blog and them. Ask for their support and explain that it’s a mutually beneficial relationship which you’re excited about nurturing.

7. Ask for repeat business

Some companies such as advertising agencies you will be acting for their clients and may be able to offer you multiple sponsored blog posts. You  might want to offer a discount for that.

Always let your client know when the post goes live, tell them the post is going down well and let them know that you’d love to help them again in the future.

8. Follow the Google guidelines

Google frowns on sites that sell text links and can even ban such sites from search engine results. They do this because there are so many search engine optimization agencies buying links and so many low quality sites that exist purely to sell links and improve search engine rankings.  Google says:

“Not all paid links violate our guidelines. Buying and selling links is a normal part of the economy of the web when done for advertising purposes, and not for manipulation of search results. Links purchased for advertising should be designated as such. This can be done in several ways, such as:

  • Adding a rel=”nofollow” attribute to the <a> tag
  • Redirecting the links to an intermediate page that is blocked from search engines with a robots.txt file”

9. Consider using a blog advertising agency

Blog advertising agencies will usually only want to work with big blogs and trusted bloggers but they will be able to negotiate the best rate possible as well as save you time finding suitable advertisers. It’s a service that’s worth considering if you’re struggling to run the advertising side of your blog alone.

10. Build a strong, trusted brand first

I waited a long time before monetizing Get In the Hot Spot because I didn’t want to plaster  my blog in ugly ads.  Stay true to your values and avoid overloading your blog with advertising or sponsored blog posts because it will cheapen your brand.

The Final Word on Sponsored Blog Posts

Charging more for sponsored blog posts and delivering quality is better for readers, advertisers and bloggers like you and me.

Remember, a sponsored blog post is a personal recommendation from you – from a real person your readers know and trust.

Don’t sell yourselves or your readers short. Price high because quality lasts and doesn’t come cheap  and brands know that.

Your time, work and recommendation is valuable and it’s worth paying for.

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What’s your take on blog advertising and sponsored blog post rates?

Photo credit: Images_of_money

About Annabel Candy

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Author: Annabel Candy

Wandering Educators July 20, 2012 at 12:23 pm

EXCELLENT, excellent post. What I gained the most from it is the very detailed steps to best practices. This, this I will refer to so many people – who are always asking and searching. Thanks for the reference guide!

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 12:41 pm

Hi Jessica,

All referalls are very welcome, thank you, so glad you found it useful:)

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Seana Smith July 20, 2012 at 12:38 pm

Hooray Annabel, I so need this information here and am bookmarking this post as I will use it again and again. Just dipping my toe in the water here, and totally agree with you that quality is best. It takes me time to write my posts and I like control and good pix, so will be very picky.

Have also just started doing giveaways which I enjoy and which I am hoping will benefit my blog and my readers. I am not charging companies for this so far as I gain out of.

All a big new adventure. Thanks for your openness and huge help!!

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 12:43 pm

Hi Seana,

Your questions inspired me to write this so thanks for asking me:) I really want to help all of both bloggers and advertisers work out a system and price guide that works for everyone.

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Krishna Everson July 20, 2012 at 12:41 pm

Wow Annabel! You have just outdone your self in the demonstrate your value department! This information is priceless. I don’t have knowledge in this area, but what I do know that it is coming up increasingly in my client circles, and will continue to rise in importance, and I need to be informed. Thank you for being so generous with this well researched information and sharing it with us.

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 12:51 pm

Hi Krisha,

It is useful and yet no one wants to share it. I’m over the cloak and dagger approach, I think collaboration and openess works better. Good to have you on board.

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Janine Fitzpatrick July 20, 2012 at 1:04 pm

Great post, and very timely at the moment when I think there are a lot of questions about montisation going on! Just one question, and I know it is probably a really dumb one, but I can’t figure out how to find out my Google PageRank?

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 1:57 pm

Hi Janine,

Great to see you here. There are always lots of questions but not a lot of concrete answers. Of course everything evolves and changes but hopefully this is a good starting point.

Just google “check google page rank” and you will find several sites that do that or you can get a Chrome extension to help you check other blogs PageRank which is useful when looking for blogs to guest post on.

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Cheryl July 20, 2012 at 1:36 pm

Oh Annabel! This is one of the best posts I’ve read about sponsored posts, another great one I remember being fromNikki of Styling You. Both posts are practical,well-thought out and backed up with your own real-life case studies.

Lots and lots of food for thought. I feel like there’s great opportunity for my blog to help businesses reach a great audience of stylish professionals but I’m yet to work out how to deal directly through marketing departments rather than with PR…

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 2:02 pm

Hi Cheryl,

I don’t think I’ve read that post (I wish I had!) but I have spoken to Nikki about blogging lots. She’s got the best tips.

Ah yes, getting through the PR gates… there’s another post in that I think:) I’m sure there are many smart advertisers who’d like to connect with you and your blog readers. These things take time.

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Sally Foley-Lewis July 20, 2012 at 1:42 pm

Annabel

While I don’t understand much of the detail, I can truly appreciate the effort you’ve gone into ensuring bloggers look out for themselves and get what they are due.

Like many situations, if one takes their eye off the ball (or doesn’t realise there’s a ball in the game), then one can lose out. It looks like you’ve got the collective back on this one.

Cheers
Sally

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 2:07 pm

Hi Sally,

Thanks for that:)

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Brent Pittman July 20, 2012 at 1:43 pm

Useful information. An SEO company wants the link without paying–they’ll write a guest post for free though…paying is a last resort. Domain Authority is also a consideration for SEO company.

Ask yourself does this email request want a link or do they want my audience? or both? This will help determine your response. Have an email drafted ready to send off for either.

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 2:10 pm

Hi Brent,

Great to see you here and thanks for the addition. Yes, I haven’t mentioned the hundreds (thousands!) of request for guest posts that come from companies, not individual bloggers. In fact I just updated my write for me page to eliminate those. It’s here in case you’re intersted: http://www.successfulblogging.com/write-for-successful-blogging/

That’s a great question for bloggers to ask when they get requests.

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Mrs Woog July 20, 2012 at 2:34 pm

Hurray for you!

I found this so informative and thank you for being so generous with your knowledge Annabelle. I hope you don’t mind, but I linked this post over at Digital Parents as it is a subject being discussed lately xxxx

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 2:36 pm

Hi Mrs. Woog,

Oh, that’s brilliant, thank you:)

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PlanningQueen July 20, 2012 at 2:54 pm

Found your informative post via Mrs Woogs’ link at DP. Thanks for sharing all this info Annabel, it will help many bloggers.

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 3:03 pm

Hi Nicole,

Great to see you here and Thumbs up for Mrs. W:)

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Christina July 20, 2012 at 2:59 pm

Thanks for being so generous and open about this topic. This is such a useful post Annabel! Updating my rate card now x

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 3:05 pm

Hi Christina,

No worries:) You have such a great niche so I’m sure hair product brands would understand the value of your ideas and endorsement.

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Trish July 20, 2012 at 3:19 pm

Thanks for sharing this very informative advice. It will be very helpful to lots of bloggers.

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katepickle July 20, 2012 at 3:21 pm

“I’m not selling an incoming link on set key phrases though, I’m selling access to an engaged readership, exclusivity because I limit the number of blog posts and the chance to be featured on an established and high quality blog.”

Loved the above quote so much! I seem to be getting more and more requests where it appears the brand just wants a link and they don’t care how they get it. It doesn’t sit right with but I’ve never been able to easily explain why till I read your post!

Thanks for sharing your wisdom so generously :)

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 3:26 pm

Hi Kate,

Yes, it’s depressing when you get those requests and doesn’t add value to anyone.

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Nikki July 20, 2012 at 3:42 pm

Great post Annabel … this is a little scale of charges that I created based on what I thought was being sold in the marketplace. These are prices that the blogger wouldn’t necessarily get but what agencies are able to pitch and sell to media buying agencies and brands direct.

0-499 page views a day: $220 (brands are going to be more interested when you get closer to that 500 page views a day mark)
500-999 page views a day: $700
1000-1999 page views a day: $1000
2000 – 4000 page views a day: $1500
4000 and up page views a day: $2000 and up

I’ve shared it with Australian fashion and beauty bloggers who are part of two Facebook groups for these niches. Some agencies leverage pricing on page views; some on uniques; some on both.

Agencies sell on your behalf but unless you’re aware of the commission (30-50% is norm in digital), you don’t know what they are charging at … just what you receive.

Having signed with The Remarkables in May, I can honestly say an agent who has amazing contacts and understands blogging and bloggers can really add value to your blog. Lorraine has not only reduced the amount of time I spend on negotiation but sells me better than I could sell myself! I’m also fully aware of the commission structure.

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 4:30 pm

Hi Nikki,

This is super useful and seems to be in line with my suggestions. Thank you for sharing it in such detail.

It’s terrible if agencies don’t tell you how much commission they take. That seems very dishonest. Of course a commission is worth paying and a big one but not knowing what it is would make me feel untrusted and that they are not trustworthy.

It sounds as if you’ve got a great one there though:)

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Rodney Bukuya July 20, 2012 at 3:50 pm

Thank you so much for sharing this Annabel. I feel like an information sponge at the moment. I’m learning so much about blogging from really great people and having a ball writing my posts.

The take away I got from your post was: Be patient young Padawan.

Happy Friday

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 4:31 pm

Hi Rodney,

Good to see you here and yes, patience is key. Content first, then readers and finally (maybe!) monetization:)

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Kimmi July 20, 2012 at 3:57 pm

Thank-you so much for doing this post. All the algorithms and different rate cards confuse me so much. I always felt I was undercharging but this has just cemented my concerns. I shall go update my rate sheet right now!

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 4:32 pm

Hi Kimmi,

Best to err on the high side with your rates, you can always negotiate down but not up.

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Rachel from Redcliffe Style July 20, 2012 at 4:03 pm

This is so helpful. Thank you so much for being so open. Rachel

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Dean July 20, 2012 at 7:42 pm

Great post Annabel. I always find it difficult to decide on advertising rates. According to your chart, I seem to be charging the right amount. It’s good to know that I’m not under/over charging people. Cheers.

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 8:16 pm

Hi Dean,

Yes, that is good to know. Could we ever overcharge?! I think these rates are great value for brands.

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Laney July 20, 2012 at 8:13 pm

So great to see this discussion out in the open. Whilst I think it is important for each blogger to determine their own value, it is helpful to have some guidelines. I don’t think there should be arbitrary standard rates based on just one figure ie Uniques because there are so many variables that determine reach, engagement and influence. I think it’s great you’ve presented a number of options.

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Annabel Candy July 20, 2012 at 8:17 pm

Hi Laney,

It’s true it’s a tricky subject because we bloggers are all unique, but I’m happy to have a rate range to work within.

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Sharon Hurley Hall July 20, 2012 at 9:28 pm

Excellent post, Annabel, chock-full of sensible advice. I’m going to add a link to this article to my own post on charging for blog posts. Fantastic!

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Denyse Whelan. Education Specialist July 20, 2012 at 11:17 pm

Hi there Annabel, what a great post and how kind and generous it is of you to be contributing to breaking down the barriers. The Barriers which have gone up around the M word or the S word…. money and sponsorship. It’s good to know that there are many who are now coming forward to help build this community and I count you, Nikki, Mrs Woog, Nic amongst those who are helping people like me understand more. Thank you so much. Denyse

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Annabel Candy July 21, 2012 at 7:23 am

Thank you Denyse:)

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Kylie July 21, 2012 at 3:38 am

Thanks so much Annabel! This information is fantastically helpful.

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Dorothy July 21, 2012 at 10:39 am

Thanks, Annabel,

I’ve learnt that you basically charge what you will be paid and you can only learn that with experience. Sometimes I am shocked by what companies will pay, but seeing how much they pay advertising agencies, it is not that surprising.

Just wanted to clarify – should all links in sponsored posts be “no follow” links?

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Annabel Candy July 21, 2012 at 6:55 pm

Hi Bethaney,

PR5 – how did you do that in a month? I mention it in my media kit.

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Joanna July 22, 2012 at 6:35 pm

Fantastic post Thank You. Great that you did write it and having asked some of those questions it’s helped clear things up for me. As you say there is too much cloak and dagger stuff and not enough clear guidelines for bloggers who are just starting to be approached by advertisers. Most of us want to know what the rules are and abide with them in an ordered playing field. Your post has really helped clear up some issues.

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Annabel Candy July 22, 2012 at 8:19 pm

Hi Jo,

It will change all the time but I hope we can all stay on the same page.

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Carli July 22, 2012 at 8:13 pm

Thank you for such an informative post Annabel. It can be difficult to judge your worth when there are so many opportunists. The sort of information is priceless.

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Annabel Candy July 22, 2012 at 8:19 pm

Hi Carli,

Glad you found it handy:)

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Barbara July 23, 2012 at 3:51 am

Excellent advice and timely for me. I am actively looking for sponsors that are a good fit. What to charge is always the question. Thank you so much for this post. I’ll be saving it.
b

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Emily July 23, 2012 at 2:45 pm

Thanks so much for this article! It’s something I’ve been thinking about for a good while now, and your chart is really helpful in making the decision to break out of the networks.

Do you have any estimates/guesses for the “beyond 50k” crowd? I can’t imagine a blog with 100k views/month would be the same as 50k (and of course it would change more as views go up and up).

Thanks again!

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Annabel Candy July 24, 2012 at 8:06 am

Hi Emily,

Yes, it should change though if it carries on the same trajectory I’m not sure.

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Emily July 23, 2012 at 2:46 pm

I’m also curious about the PR5 in a month! So awesome for you. How’d you manage it?

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Annabel Candy July 24, 2012 at 8:07 am

Hi Rhonda,

Great to see you here:)

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Linda July 24, 2012 at 9:34 am

Wow, Annabel, thanks so much! Possibly the most useful post EVER!
I sucked up every single word.

If only others were as forthcoming as you… I can’t be doing with all the cloak and dagger stuff when it comes to monetization. A lot of bloggers aim to monetize, and I know many are after the same brands/advertisers, but without freely sharing some of the essential information to get on with the business side of things it boils down to a lot of second guessing. So, cheers!

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Annabel Candy October 9, 2012 at 9:05 pm

Hi Linda,

I think things will work better if we work together. Glad to help:)

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lydia August 2, 2012 at 10:44 am

Just got my first ‘sponsored post’ offer on my blog and you gave the most useful tips I’ve seen so far, the other ones gave me similar anxiety to when I was doing my math exams! Thank you!

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Susan August 13, 2012 at 8:15 pm

Hello Annabel,
Great post, I tried googling “Blog Advertising Agencies” but
did not have very much luck. Any ideas would be appreciated.

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Daniel McBane August 16, 2012 at 4:45 pm

From the comments it seems a lot of bloggers are looking for advice on sponsored posts. I’ll add my name to that list; I received an offer to include a sponsored post on my site, but I had no idea if the offer was any good or not. I’m glad I found this page–you’ve been a tremendous help in assessing the offer. Thank you so much.

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Lori September 12, 2012 at 6:07 am

Thanks so much Annabel! I appreciate the time you took to share all this and help out those of us trying to navigate the murky waters of blog advertising! I just found your site today – and am glad I did. (I’ll be back!) Thanks!

Lori :)

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Amanda September 12, 2012 at 3:02 pm

I just found this page while looking up ways to earn money from blogging. I’m disabled (but because I stayed home much of the last 15 years taking care of our children, I don’t have enough credits for Social Security) and my husband recently survived a “widow maker” heart attack (shudders). Unfortunately, we do not have short term disability for him and he needs a bypass…that will keep him out of work 6-8 weeks! I’ve written articles for small parenting websites, but I’m still a newbie! If you have ANY advice, I’m all ears, or rather, eyes! :)
If you don’t have time to respond, I’ll understand! I’ll be continuing my search either way! It’s just difficult as most of the sites are no longer up or current. I am not expecting riches as a newbie, but any amount is more than I’m bringing home now, right? :) By the way, I linked to this page on my Facebook (700+ friends). I hope some of them come here & perhaps even follow your blog!
Again, thank you for any personal advice. I must say your information seems extremely informative, and I hope someday I can be successful in a blogging career. After years of my husband supporting me, I really want to help support HIM. Cheers!

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Annabel Candy October 3, 2012 at 12:47 pm

Hi Linda,

Totally agree with your thoughts in that last paragraph. I have been rewarded in many ways for my blogging. Advertising money is just a small percentage of those rewards and shouldn’t be a major focus, especially to begin with.

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diana elizabeth October 30, 2012 at 4:05 am

I want to get into more blog reviews and sponsors so this was EXCELLENT. THANK YOU!!

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KOTHEA October 31, 2012 at 1:35 am

Thank you very much for the information.

FYI: I have been paid between GBP30 and GBP100 to host a blog post written by the advertiser for a PR3 with 4,000 visits per month (not sure if unique). I’m not sure if that is too low.

So those fees are just for a striaght ad placement with minimal effort from me.

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Nizam Khan November 13, 2012 at 7:45 pm

Awesome and informative article! Well yes, one should start by charging less until one can build up a portfolio to show other advertisers and get testimonials and as you mentioned it’s better to mentioned that the post is a sponsored post as per the FTC regulations. The table is just excellent which provides the details for charging for sponsored blog posts. Thanks Annabel for sharing this info :)

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Pavan Somu December 1, 2012 at 2:54 am

That’s quite a big amount. But people who acts as a mediator swallows the money and pays us $20-$30 here in India. Even some people pays only $2.75 in form of online mobile recharge. May I know how can we get direct clients who pays for posting links. I have 2 PR3 blogs and 1 PR2 blog.

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Ashley - Embracing Beauty December 19, 2012 at 4:17 am

Great article! …and can you recommend me to a few of your guest authors? I have a PR 4 site. :)

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Craig Cole January 10, 2013 at 10:57 pm

I’m sure Page Rank and keyword relevance are the main factors for advertisers wanting to place sponsored posts but the cost also depends on what niche you’re in.

I run a PR3 gaming blog that gets over 200,000 uniques per month (and over 500K in peak months) and the most I’ve been offered so far is a mere £120.

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matt January 10, 2013 at 11:40 pm

Annabel- Great article!! Really informative. I tried to find blog advertising agencies and had no luck. Do you have some agencies you could recommend?

Cheers-Matt

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matt January 10, 2013 at 11:49 pm

Clarification- It is a U.S. blog thanks-matt

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Deli January 13, 2013 at 6:01 pm

Very helpful post. Thanks for sharing this :)

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iPhone5s January 25, 2013 at 2:56 pm

Do you have some sources of site where sponsored posts can be purchased? I cannot find any credible ones.

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Pawel January 30, 2013 at 12:17 am

don’t agree with how you rate your sponsored posts. I think Google Pagerank has nothing to do with the spons. post price.

I would say that
- domain authority (opensiteexplorer.com) – Predicts domain’s ranking potential in the search engines based on an algorithmic combination of all link metrics.
- Unique Visitors – the number of unduplicated (counted only once) visitors to your website in a 30 past days
- Visits – the number of visits
- Pageviews – Pageviews is the total number of pages viewed. Repeated views of a single page are counted.
- Social Networks your sponsored post is promoted like numbers of fan on your FB, G+, Twitters etc
- how frequently you publish – if you do 2 post per day – your sponsored post go down on the list – means less people read it. It is not about “How many sponsored blog posts you’ll write each month”

those are factors that affect price

Very important is how the post perform in time – how many shares on FB it has, + on G+, retweets on Twitter etc.

anyway great post and give lots of good tips for bloggers that didn’t write spons. post and would like to in a future.

One more thing – take payment in advance – you can always consider to use virtal for managing sponsored post campaigns. Your money is safe there as the system will keep the money you earned before you finish the job.

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fashionandstylepolice February 20, 2013 at 3:25 am

Lovely post. Thanks for the tips. You have given me a clear insight on what to charge for sponsored posts.

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Chris March 19, 2013 at 3:11 pm

Thank you so much! I have been approached about doing a sponsored post and I had no idea where to start. This saves me a lot of research time because you covered all the bases.

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Heather April 19, 2013 at 2:02 am

Thanks for this post! It gave me the confidence to ask for the lower end of the rate your chart recommends. It was immediately accepted, so I may have to raise that a little- but it was a good place to start & without your post I probably would have started lower! So thank you!

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Haroun Kola April 27, 2013 at 9:22 pm

Thanks for this post. Like Heather, its also given me confidence in asking the appropriate amount for the posts I publish on my site.

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Jane May 8, 2013 at 11:17 pm

I’ve never heard of page rank having any value on what to charge for sponsored content, although I think it could play a small roll. In my experience brands want to see not only PV and Uniques but your reach in other social media outlets (Pinterest, FB, Twitter, G+ etc)

I think your rates might be off a bit. I’ve worked with many large brands for the last several years and have been making very good money at it. My page rank is 5, my uniques average about 400k+/mo with pageviews at 700k- 1M+/month and on average I get about $1,500 per post, but have worked with a few brands that paid much higher, but they were very few and far between.

(kept my identity anonymous because I don’t feel comfortable sharing that personal information publicly)

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Annabel Candy May 9, 2013 at 8:28 am

Hi Jane,

I think PageRank is just a quick indication of blog and blog post authority.

Thanks for sharing your sponsored blog post rates. That’s great news and I do mention in the post that other bloggers charge and get paid that rate. Unfortunately there are still a lot of brands and advertisers who don’t understand that and think even 50% of that rate is too much. In fact I just got a rude email from one of them this morning so reading your comment has cheered me up :)

You have some amazing blog statistics there – keep up the great work – I’m sure more and more brands will want to work with you and hope the rates will stay strong.

Bloggers deliver huge value so it’s really just a case of us choosing to work only with brands who appreciate that and are prepared to pay reasonable rates for sponsored blog posts.

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The Wandering Soles June 19, 2013 at 1:37 am

Hi Annabel,

Thank you so much for this valuable and informative post! There are so many helpful points here; we will definitely bookmark it for use in the future as we work on monetizing our website. We are a little worried about adding embedded links, after reading the part on Google’s disapproval of them. We will have to look more into the methods to legitimize them as we are teaching ourselves as we go.

Thanks again! Keep up the great work!

Peace,

The Wandering Soles

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Shannon - A Girl's Gotta Spa! June 25, 2013 at 8:15 am

I wish brands would follow the outline you provided above as to how they pay. I am a PR 5 with about 10K uniques and I can tell you that brands scoff if they are asked to pay more than $50. The sad fact is that there are so many blogs out there willing to accept the lowball offers, that they simply will go elsewhere if you won’t agree to less than your worth. :(

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Kat June 25, 2013 at 4:36 pm

I have set my own prices and guidelines for sponsored posts by now, but I think this is a great post for anyone needing initial guidance.

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Liz from WomanlyWoman.com June 25, 2013 at 11:13 pm

Would you be willing to share some links to the blog ad agencies you mentioned?

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Annabel Candy June 26, 2013 at 1:44 pm

Hi Liz,

Agencies seem to come and go. It’s always in flux but these sponsored blog post rates are still up to date and based on my rates at http://www.getinthehotspot.com/ and those of other bloggers.

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Sharon June 28, 2013 at 12:47 pm

Great post! I just received my first sponsored post from a national brand. Since, this is my first, the pay seems to be write along the chart above. As I become more experienced, I will be more comfortable with exact amounts that I will charge. At this moment, I am concentrating on doing a fabulous job for this post. I am also doing my first review of a product. My blog is been in effect for a solid year and love that it is taking off. Thanks for this info. Definitely bookmarking for later use also.

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Kimberley July 9, 2013 at 3:01 pm

Hi Annabel, thanks so much for posting this! I’ve been approached recently for the first time for sponsored posts and really needed info on how to proceed. This is invaluable! Thank you Thank you :)

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Lauren July 28, 2013 at 4:38 pm

Regarding “nofollow”, doesn’t that defeat the object of the whole thing? i.e. aren’t these companies looking for a decent backlink as well as some exposure? If so how do you manage it so that you don’t get blacklisted by google but you keep the advertisers happy?

Also what’s the standard practice regarding whether the link opens in the same window or a new window? I’d obviously prefer readers not to be taken away from my site, but do the advertisers expect that?

Thanks in advance.

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Annabel Candy July 28, 2013 at 6:05 pm

Hi Lauren,

Sell links is bad business practice. Sell sponsored blog posts for the access to an engaged readership, exclusivity (limit the number of sponsored blog posts), the chance to be featured on an established and high quality blog and your personal endorsement.

I always open links to external sites in a new window.

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Magnolia August 10, 2013 at 3:49 am

I realized several years ago that allowing unsolicited guest posts on my blog for free was essentially handing out free advertising to whomever asked.

How stupid is that? I now treat solicited guest posts as a form of paid, permenent advertising. I charge $125 per post. $250 if I write the post.

This has done two things for me:

1. Kept the majority of link dumpers out of my hair
2. Sent a message to sponsors and advertisers that I’m serious about what I’m doing on my blog and if they want to partner with someone who is professional, then I’m their girl.

I’ve gotten a little push back from other women bloggers who think I’m abandoning the sisterhood and not promoting “community”

As a business woman, I happen to think those women need a lesson in Econ 101.

After looking at your chart, I also think I might be under charging for these posts based on my traffic numbers.

Magnolia

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Annabel Candy August 10, 2013 at 8:42 am

Hi Magnolia,

Great to hear your feedback on sponsored blog post and guest post rates. I think your rates are low too considering what you’re offering.

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Magnolia August 10, 2013 at 11:59 pm

Hello Annabel,

I will very likely charge more in the coming months. Usually, once a year, I evaluate my advertising prices.

As my traffic and page views grow, so do my advertising prices. I STILL can’t get above a PR3, however, and it drives me bananas.

I actually reached PR5 for a time. I do not know who/what/when/where/or how. But, it didn’t happen – briefly.

But, I do not spend a lot of energy trying to improve that specifically. I’m very busy with so many things, it’s very difficult for me to focus intently on getting a higher PR.

Anyway, like I told you. I love this post. I’ve been posting everywhere for fellow bloggers to see…..particularly those who are perfectly happy to write for free and to accept guest posts for free.

I don’t understand how they cannot understand that they are providing free service, access, and advertising to other blogs, sites, companies.

Magnolia

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Vivek Khanduri August 27, 2013 at 1:53 pm

My blog is PR3 but the traffic is low. How much should i charge?
Need your help.

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Magnolia August 29, 2013 at 10:59 am

Vivek,

I’m sure Annabel will have some excellent advice for you. I wanted to add, however, that perhaps efforts to drive more traffic to your site might be helpful?

I find that as my page views grow (though my PR sits stubbornly at 3), that advertisers and sponsors are very willing to pay my advertising rates. I push a lot of traffic to my blog via Twitter, Facebook, and other sites that I write for.

So, perhaps you could try to get more page views? Then you can apply your page views to the formulas?

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Vivek Khanduri August 30, 2013 at 2:57 am

Well thanks for you valuable advice Magnolia. Well I will definitely do what you said to me. I will use social media to gain visitors.

Cailin November 6, 2013 at 12:49 am

Extremely useful – that algorithm has never made any sense to me. We could try to develop a new one all day to account for Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, etc, but the reality is that those metrics will mean different things to each advertiser. The real question: how much do we really value ourselves, our time and the space on our blog?

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Crystal Brothers December 11, 2013 at 1:59 am

Looks great. According to this, I should be getting $600-$1,200 for a sponsored post. Now where’s your post on finding the people who will pay that? I would love to see that one :) I’d be happy to charge that much if I knew how to get connected with someone who’d actually pay it. And I think that is a common problem. I could set my rates for whatever I want to, but that doesn’t mean I would ever sell anything.

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TheSojourner June 26, 2014 at 4:00 pm

Somebody just asked me for a sponsored blog post and have no idea how much to charge. Glad to find this. Yay! :)

Thanks for this informative post. I think I’ll start small. :)

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Sue Anne June 26, 2014 at 4:09 pm

So glad you found us!

Sue

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Sofia June 30, 2014 at 7:46 pm

Thank you for interesting information.
Sofia

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